Aonach Eagach

Aonach Eagach

£200.00 Price for 1 to 2 people.

The Aonach Eagach is a classic mountain ridge on the north side of Glen Coe. Enjoy fantastic scrambling as we traverse this rocky ridge amongst the highest mountains of the UK.

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Description

A fine a technical ridge in Glen Coe. The Aonach Eagach is much sort after route to the north of the main A82 road and has everything, spires, stunning views, scrambling and a great pub at the end! What more could you want from a day out.

The Aonach Eagach starts with an ascent from the top of Glencoe onto Am Bodach. From this summit the ridge start straight away with an entertaining descent and scrambles before reaching Meall Dearg. More scrambling follows this on your way over Stob Coire Leith to Sgorr nam Finnaidh. Finally a nice walk down past the Pap of Glen Coe leads to the Clachaig Inn for a well earned pint.

Because of the nature of the route there are exposed and dangerous sections that require the use of a rope to make it safe for all but seasoned mountaineers. This means I run this as a maximum of 1 to 2 ratio. The added benefit of this is you get bespoke fantastic instruction.

Below is a video produced by the BMC and Trail Magazine showing the ridge in all it’s glory.


Accommodation not included.

 

Additional Information

Ability

Hillwalking fit (Aonach Eagach is a long mountain day sometimes lasting as much as 8 hours so being fit enough to enjoy this type of trip is necessary.)

Equipment

Waterproof Jacket, Waterproof Trousers, Hat, Gloves, Fleece / Jumper, Sturdy Boots, Rucksack (40l), Food and Drink, Map and Compass, Headtorch (especially in spring/autumn)

Location(s)

The Aonach Eagach is in Glen Coe in the western highlands of Scotland.

Start

8:30am

Finish

5pm (The Aonach is a long day out, finishing at 5pm is a guideline and shouldn’t be taken as gospel. Expect a full day in the hills.)

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